December 7, 2016

Celebrating Bay Area Customers

We wouldn’t be here without our customers. The message may sound cliché, but only because it’s so true, and we at Ideate know it. Our work is interesting and rewarding because of our customers. We thank our customers throughout the year, and we look forward to each December when we bring them together with our team to express our gratitude, celebrate our accomplishments, and have a little fun.

On December 8, 2016, at 11:30 AM at Autodesk Gallery in San Francisco, we are hosting our 6th annual Bay Area Customer Appreciation Party. We will honor our customers and celebrate in the spirit of the word “ideate,” which means to have or form an idea. From the spark of an idea through fruition, we work with customers to strengthen their businesses with building information modeling (BIM). Those ideas—the new, innovative ways of designing, building, and managing structures—create an energetic atmosphere at Ideate in which we all continue to learn, develop strong relationships, and make a positive difference to our teams, customers, and communities.

In addition to using BIM software at their own companies, several of our customers have worked to advance the Architecture, Engineering, Construction, and Owner industries by leading discussions at our user group meetings. At the party, Bob Palioca, Ideate president and CEO, will take the opportunity to formally thank them all and present them each with a gift. And of course, we will have food and fun … Bring your smile, because there will be a photo booth!

For more information about our Bay Area Customer Appreciation Party, contact Qatanna Palioca.

November 22, 2016

Revit MEP Beyond the Basics: Project Setup & Workflow

Hello All, Bill Johnson - Senior MEP/AEC Tech at Ideate writing to you today. I am pleased to introduce to you a brand-new course titled, “Revit MEP Beyond the Basics: Project Setup & Workflow.” This course has been a long time in the making, with lots of on-going discussion and reiterations.

One of the main drivers for this course was driven home to me during my most recent Revit MEP Family class. The question was asked, "Bill, besides specific MEP Families, what else should we have setup in our Revit discipline specific templates?” “What should be setup,” indeed! This is exactly the question our new class will explore. Plus, we will cover some of the more important, yet sometimes overlooked, aspects of Revit MEP, starting with the Three Major Project Setup types. And here you thought there was only one!

We will also review several key setup and configuration items that should be addressed by the advanced Revit user to help with productivity issues and consistency within a project. We will focus on modifying Project and Family templates that are included with Revit MEP, and will review working with Phases and customizing Panel Schedules.

This class will be more than a lecture, it will be a vehicle through which you can share what you have learned, such as the pros and cons of Phasing and Design Options in Revit MEP. You will, of course, also learn how to migrate your AutoCAD settings into Revit MEP; this covers the system environment and the project settings, which help you control the appearance of components and sub-components with a Project. It is our goal that by the end of this class you will have a solid start on your office template, which can be then used as your default template.

Some of the topics to be covered will be:
• Views and view templates
• Using Scope Boxes for view size consistency and manipulation of angled building plans
• Tips for cleaning up architect’s files
• Controlling display of information within linked files
• Separating mechanical equipment types into schedules
• Addressing why pipes seem to have difficulty being drawn when connecting to fixtures
• Differentiate circuited vs. uncircuited electrical devices

Revit itself is one of the most used Building Information Modeling applications across different disciplines, including architecture, MEP and structural. The Revit MEP Beyond the Basics course will offer Revit MEP professionals the opportunity to enhance their knowledge and refine their skills using the software.

The first class will be taught online in two, four-hour days, on December 19th and 20th. In addition to this class, we at Ideate have increased our offerings to include Revit for Interior Architecture, Revit Architecture Families and AutoCAD Advanced. This is a very exciting time for our training department.

For a more in-depth look into our Revit MEP Beyond the Basics: Project Setup & Workflow. – Online class and other new Ideate online training offerings, visit the Ideate website.

http://www.ideateinc.com/about/about.htmlBill Johnson
Senior Application Specialist MEP/AEC Solutions

Bill has over 25 years experience in applying MEP & AEC design solutions for large commercial companies, this has led to actively developed Autodesk® Revit® implementation strategies, techniques, and procedures for architectural and MEP companies. He has worked for TEECOM Design Group, GTE/GTEL, Greg LeDoux and Associates, and Scottish Power in England. Bill is an Autodesk MEP Implementation Certified Expert, and has been the Lead Designer for several multi-million dollar communication sites which have included structural, electrical, HVAC, conduit, cable plans and equipment layouts. He graduated from the Pasadena Institute of Technology and has a Sustainable Design Certification from the University of California at Berkeley.

November 10, 2016

Revit MEP: It’s shocking news - Electrical Circuit Schedule

Hello All, this post is to remind all the Revit MEP “Reviteers” out there that Revit is as much a documentation and database tool as it is a design assist tool. In this post, I will cover how you can use certain schedules to help make informed decisions about specific elements of design, such as voltage drop and wire sizing.

It’s important to note, Revit tends to overestimate the wire length at times, and therefore outputs a higher voltage drop than necessary. These are not intended to be exact numbers; they are intended to inform the designer when further research is needed. Also, note the Feeder Tag column (i.e., MCB2, MCA2) is not directly related to the wire size. There are still a few quirks in Revit that cause any Automated Feeder Tags/schedules to be unreliable in rare cases, and unfortunately unusable on most projects.


Now, let’s dive in.


First, create an Electrical Circuit schedule with the following Parameters and add a Calculated Value, Voltage Drop (%), with the formula shown. (click to enlarge images.)

The schedule below shows a portion of the resulting Electrical Circuit schedule. This information is directly related to the Panel Schedule, so all information can be updated in any of the three following places: floor plans, Panel Schedules, or the schedule below.
It’s also possible to apply conditional formatting to the schedule to highlight areas of concern. Below, the conditional formatting for the Voltage Drop (%) field is shown, which highlights any value over 3% with a red background. This is very helpful when trying to quickly identify problematic circuits needing more research.
As stated previously, these schedules can be used for design assist tasks. Take breaker sizing for example: adding the True Current field to the schedule will show the design load, or in some cases, one could use the value of Apparent Current. It’s easy to add a few simple Calculated Values and conditional formatting to quickly double-check that the size of the breaker is adequate for the load.

Of course, this will not be 100% accurate in all situations. Motors, for example, will need further engineering.

To check breaker size, first add the True Current, or Apparent Current, field to the schedule (not shown).

Then add the two following Calculated Values with the shown conditional formatting on the Current Difference:

125% True Current is the minimum allowed breaker size, and ensures that the circuit is never more than 80% loaded.

The current difference takes that minimum breaker size and subtracts the breaker rating.

With a value of zero, the breaker size = the minimum allowed, therefore the size is adequate. 

Any negative numbers are acceptable, as they indicate a breaker size larger than the minimum allowed. The conditional formatting, when this number is larger than zero, is highlighted in red to illustrate an inadequately sized breaker.

Now you're ready to get started using Revit for design assist tasks, try this workflow in action.


For more information on the software solutions, training, and consulting Ideate provides, please visit the Ideate Inc. website.

http://www.ideateinc.com/about/about.htmlBill Johnson
Senior Application Specialist MEP/AEC Solutions

Bill has over 25 years experience in applying MEP & AEC design solutions for large commercial companies, this has led to actively developed Autodesk® Revit® implementation strategies, techniques, and procedures for architectural and MEP companies. He has worked for TEECOM Design Group, GTE/GTEL, Greg LeDoux and Associates, and Scottish Power in England. Bill is an Autodesk MEP Implementation Certified Expert, and has been the Lead Designer for several multi-million dollar communication sites which have included structural, electrical, HVAC, conduit, cable plans and equipment layouts. He graduated from the Pasadena Institute of Technology and has a Sustainable Design Certification from the University of California at Berkeley.

November 9, 2016

Ideate, Inc. Launches Bluebeam Revu Class


San Francisco, CA, November 7, 2016-Ideate, Inc., a Bluebeam value added reseller, announced today that it has expanded its relationship with Bluebeam, Inc. to include classroom training on Bluebeam Revu for the architecture, engineering, construction, and owner (AECO) communities. Bluebeam Revu is a powerful PDF creation, editing, markup, and collaboration software.

“We decided to offer this one-day course after hearing that some of our customers use just a fraction of the tools available in Bluebeam Revu,” said Sash Kazeminejad, an award-winning instructor with Ideate and a Bluebeam Certified Instructor. “In too many cases, field or office professionals learn just what they need to get by. This course teaches the full functionality of Revu so users can achieve greater productivity. During this course, we will walk students through hands-on activities using AECO industry-based datasets. To ensure that everyone is able to start using the tools right away, we will give them a comprehensive workbook and datasets to practice with during and after the class.”

In a progressive learning structure where each session builds on previous objectives, attendees will get an overview of the software and will learn how to save time with:

· Markup tools, Revu stamps, the Tool Chest™, and the Markups list
· PDF creation
· Documentation management and set up
· Studio Session and Projects

After completing the course, attendees who pass an online test with Bluebeam will be able to distinguish themselves as “Bluebeam Certified Users.”

“One of our goals at Ideate is to help our customers get the most out of their software investments,” says Bob Palioca, president of Ideate, Inc. “This new educational offering demonstrates our commitment to achieving that goal.”
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About Ideate, Inc.
Ideate, Inc. is a leading Autodesk Authorized Developer with 25+ years’ experience in software development and specific focus on Building Information Modeling (BIM). As an Autodesk solutions provider, Ideate has offered quality software, training, support and custom consulting services to the architectural, engineering and construction (AEC) industries since 1992. Headquartered in San Francisco, California and operating Autodesk Authorized Training Centers (ATCs) in California, Oregon, and Washington, Ideate is recognized as an Autodesk Platinum Partner for Architecture, Engineering, and Construction, Autodesk’s highest level of authorization.